10 August 2007

Not Said in All of This

It's raining again this morning, and while the subways are all running normally (except mine -- there was an "earlier incident" at 125th Street that took out the 1/2/3 for a half hour), the MTA is on high alert.

In the first days of the post mortem of the GFof07, there's one thing that keeps coming up that I find really interesting. One of the reasons for the track flooding was that the MTA didn't have enough workers on the tracks to clear debris that was blocking the drains. Newspapers, principally. There's a reason you use newspaper for elementary school papier mache projects. It takes a long time of sogginess before that stuff disintegrates.

So the MTA has to put more track workers out to clear tracks, is the conclusion that seems to have been reached, by the MTA at least. But you know what? How about asking -- or even telling, there's a crazy thought -- passengers not to throw newspapers and other trash on the track? How about sending a bill to the publishers of the Metro and AM New York, the two free newspaper that are pressed into your hand outside of every subway station?

Yes, it feels like we pay a lot to ride a subway that's dirty and hot and breaks down in the rain. But does that give everyone the right to treat it like their personal dumpster? Has the concept of personal responsibility completely evaporated in this city?

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4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

What exactly happened this morning at 125th Street station (No.2 train)?

9:58 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What exactly happened this morning at the 125th Street station? Was there anything in the newspaper?

10:00 PM  
Anonymous Libby said...

Couldn't agree more. Trash is a big, but really preventable, problem.

4:25 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I don't think trash is realistically preventable. We are who we are. I'll gladly volunteer to stand on street corners and scold litterbugs, but I don't think it will do much good.
Now installing drain grates that are harder to clog, now that's an interesting idea.

9:48 AM  

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